Table Saw Crosscut Sled

A Table Saw Crosscut sled is the perfect alternative to creating perfectly square cross cuts safely. A perfect example is using it to trim cutting boards. Here is a step-by-step guide to creating a crosscut sled.

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DIMENSIONS:  First, cut the desired dimensions for your table saw sled. I went with 24×27.

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BACK FENCE: The back of the fence is 3-1/4 tall. I glued up the 3/4″  ply for thickness and attached to the butt end of the sled.

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FRONT FENCE: The front fence is the same length but stands 2-1/2″ tall since it sits on top of the sled. Use a Router with at least a 3/8″ rounding bit to create a comfortable grip.

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RUNNERS: I made my own runners out of scrap hardwood I had laying around. Make them about 1/8″ shorter than the slot (height, not length).

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FENCE SETUP: Attach the fence from the bottom with one screw to the sled (right side). I took out a 1×2″ section with my dado blades on the left of the fence for future miter sled attachment.

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ALIGNMENT: After cutting through the sled with your blade, line up the cut to the fence as square as possible (90 degrees) and secure the fence with a screw to prevent movement.

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LOCKING: After ensuring your sled is perfectly square using the “5 cut rule” (Google it),  lock the fence into place with more screws.

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T-TRACK: Cut your T-Track with a miter saw. The aluminum is soft enough, so it won’t harm your blade too much. Leave a 1″ gap to allow some space to feed in your T-Track accessories.

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BOOM!

 

January 18, 2017